New at dating

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It actually makes a lot of sense, and Chief Product Officer Chris Cox even joked that he thought Facebook would have launched dating more than a decade ago.

“One of the great ironies for me is that when a lot of us joined the very first version of the service in 2004, back when it was just a handful of college students, we were convinced that dating would be the next feature Facebook was going to add,” Cox said onstage at Facebook’s conference last week.

The idea, of course, is that you’ll immediately have something in common.

Facebook is building a separate messaging experience just for this dating feature — it won’t use Messenger or Whats App unless both parties decide to swap numbers or usernames.

It spent a lot of F8 trying to convince people that, yes, Facebook can be trusted again.

Observers were quick to point out that launching a new feature like dating, which comes with all kinds of privacy expectations and implications, is either bold or tone deaf, depending on who you ask.

Match Group’s stock plummeted by more than 17 percent as soon as the news was announced.

The profiles look similar to other mobile-focused dating apps like Tinder and Bumble, with full-page profile photos.

However, Facebook’s take on dating is more community-focused, with integrations for the events and groups you’re a part of on the platform.

“We have designed this with privacy and safety in mind from the beginning.

Your friends aren’t going to see your profile, and you’re only going to be suggested to people who are not your friends.” Facebook product chief Chris Cox took the stage after Zuckerberg to shed more light on the new dating features and to give the audience a tour of the design.

Cox also mentioned a feature called “unlocking,” which will let any user of Facebook’s dating platform make his or her profile visible to other attendees of events or members of groups.

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