Radiocarbon dating the shroud of turin

6854933580_2c8b688306_z

When he developed the negative he noticed that it showed a positive image of a human face.

radiocarbon dating the shroud of turin-63radiocarbon dating the shroud of turin-53

The Shroud’s relationship with modern technology began in 1898 when Secondo Pia took the first photographs of the Shroud.

There is now a mountain of evidence about the Shroud, but too many dismiss the possibility of the Shroud’s authenticity based on the Carbon-14 dating alone.

However, a good detective does not rely on one piece of evidence. Here are the pieces of evidence which I find compelling. It is not a stain, nor is it painted on the Shroud.

Not only can scientists and historians not reproduce the image using medieval technologies, they can’t reproduce it with modern technology.

Italian scientist Paolo Di Lazzaro tried for five years to replicate the image and concluded that it was produced by ultraviolet light, but the ultraviolet light necessary to reproduce the image “exceeds the maximum power released by all ultraviolet light sources available today.” The time for such a burst “would be shorter than one forty-billionth of a second, and the intensity of the ultra violet light would have to be around several billion watts.” 2) The 3D capabilities of the image. The wounds of the crucified man are all consistent not only with Roman crucifixion, but the details of Jesus’ particular crucifixion – the scourging, the crown of thorns, no broken bones, and the wound in the side.

It is, they believe, the burial cloth of Jesus Christ.

You must have an account to comment. Please register or login here!