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The bulk of the references collected are 12th & 13th century - as they have all been taken from the C. The final phase (from 1860 onwards) was associated with the rapid devleopment of the central Glamorgan coalfield, especially the steam-coal deposits of the Rhondda Valleys (for export purposes). Talbot MP of the Margam Estate (Owner of Bryndu Slip Colliery) started a temporary school in colliery stables, known as Bryndu Works School. Instruction as good as could be carried into effect during the short time the school has been erected; discipline good; methods good.G., this has been omitted in the record but the page has been given for reference. By 1900, this region had become one of the most densely populated parts of Britain. In the 1860's Brydu School was built at the end of School Road in Kenfig Hill. From the following information which appeared in the National of Library of Wales Journal in 1957, it would appear that Bryndu School in Kenfig Hill was already open a few years before this date as a report on the school was compiled by Mr H. Thanks are due to Major Lewis Rugg for acquainting the Museum with the discovery, to Mr Clements, his foreman at the quarry and to Mr G. Stacey, of Porthcawl for much readily granted help.The site is depicted & annotated as "Old Windmill" on OS 25" County Series Map of 1877 with an apparently working windmill some 100m to the south where there are 2 buildings annotated "Windmill" - it's not clear if this is just the name given to the buildings or if there was indeed a working windmill there. During the 18th century, Sir Humphrey Mackworth's Charity School at Neath for his miners' children & Nevill's Free Schools at Llanelly during the early years of the 19th century wre the earliest.The Windmill acted as a navigation mark for vessels aligning Porthcawl harbour breakwater, Porthcawl Inn & the westenmost extend of the notorious Nash Sands. The second phase (1820-1860) saw the development of the heavy industries which necessitated the sinking of large numbers of new pits to meet the high fuel demands.It was not possible to place in contact with this portion a fragment of the frontal bone which was present.A fragment of the superciliary ridge indicates that the specimen belongs to a male and that these bony ridges were strongly developed. But apart from the character of the man & his work his long episcopate of 33 full years is of itself a memorable thing in the annals of the see.

The bones, though sodden, were mostly well preserved, although the more spongy parts had largely decayed and the upper portions had been damaged when the grave was first discovered. It may have been lost in the course of building the grave, entering later with the soil. Camb., 1919, p345)) - the present example may have been intended for use either as knife or scraper. Fleure & Mr Sansbury (see Appendix below) has shown the skeleton to be that of an adult male in middle life & revealed features which suggest that the skull was "at least sub-brachycephalic," and that the individual may therefore have been of Beaker type.

We give them in the order of induction as follows: A snippet of information on maps of Glamorgan - the following is from the Glamorgan section of Ogilby's strip-map "The Road from London to St David's" first published in 1675. In South Wales during the 19th century the rapid development of heavy industries & coal mining created centres of dense populations where voluntary efforts to provide education in many areas proved inadequate & ineffective.

Place names & notable buildings can be seen on this section from Aberavon to Cowbridge (A48). The characteristic feature of the industrial evolution of South Wales during the first half of the 19th century was the growth & expansion of the ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgical industries.

in maximum dimensions, the floor of which had been prepared for the body by a layer of oolitic limestone flakes. The removal of the capstone showed the grave to be full of comparatively clean tightly packed soil which revealed no trace on its surface of the remains it contained. The cist was too roughly built to be thoroughly earth-tight.

The coverstone, a large slab of Pennant sandstone, the source of which was probably not more than 2 miles away (I have to thank Dr. This earth was cleared out with some difficulty, care being taken to leave the skeleton as far as possible undisturbed. The earth in the grave contained a number of snail-shells. S., as belonging to two species; Cepaea hortensis (Muller) & Cepaea nemoralis (Linne).

His strips also indicated the junctions of cross-routes but the only topographical features are villages & important houses. Llanelly & Hafod (Swansea) Copperworks schools, the Rhymney, Dowlais & Neath Abbey Ironworks schools etc.

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