The global dating revolution

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The beginning of the Scientific Revolution, the Scientific Renaissance, was focused on the recovery of the knowledge of the ancients; this is generally considered to have ended in 1632 with publication of Galileo's Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems.

While preparing a revised edition of his Principia, Newton attributed his law of gravity and his first law of motion to a range of historical figures.

(Since the 19th century, scientific knowledge has been assimilated by the rest of the world).

Since that revolution turned the authority in English not only of the Middle Ages but of the ancient world—since it started not only in the eclipse of scholastic philosophy but in the destruction of Aristotelian physics—it outshines everything since the rise of Christianity and reduces the Renaissance and Reformation to the rank of mere episodes, mere internal displacements within the system of medieval Christendom....

It is important to note that ancient precedent existed for alternative theories and developments which prefigured later discoveries in the area of physics and mechanics; but in light of the limited number of works to survive translation in a period when many books were lost to warfare, such developments remained obscure for centuries and are traditionally held to have had little effect on the re-discovery of such phenomena; whereas the invention of the printing press made the wide dissemination of such incremental advances of knowledge commonplace.

Meanwhile, however, significant progress in geometry, mathematics, and astronomy was made in medieval times.

The work formulated the laws of motion and universal gravitation thereby completing the synthesis of a new cosmology.

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